Calliope Crossing

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Park Meadow Trail

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GW Burn/ Dry Creek

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Camp Polk Meadow

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Cold Springs Campground

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Pole Creek Trail

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Indian Ford Campground

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Trout Creek Swamp

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Glaze Meadow & Gobbler's Knob

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Rooster Rock Burn

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Seasons

Winter
Spring
Summer
Fall

Location

From the east side of Sisters, travel north on N. Locust St. which becomes Camp Polk Road as it leaves Sisters. Travel 2.8 miles and look for Indian Ford Road on your left. Turn left and take Indian Ford to Pine Street (this is difficult to see, it’s just beyond milepost 2 from the junction of Camp Polk Road and Indian Ford Road). Take a left at Pine Street and park before the creek. Walk to the creek and look for Calliope Hummingbirds perched up on willows. Just past the creek crossing there is a gate on your left. Go through that gate and bird the area near the elk exclusion fence. Sapsuckers usually nest here. Go back through the gate and close the gate. Walk or drive the road to your right. Fine for passenger cars.  You will come to another exclosure. This exclosure is very birdy. Continue birding along the creek for as long as you like.

Directions

Habitat and Birds

This is one of the most well-known and beloved birding locations in the county. Dense riparian habitat surrounded by ponderosa pine forest supports all three Sapsuckers, “Western” and Gray Flycatchers, Cassin’s Vireo, Western Wood-pewee, House Wren, Common Yellowthroat, Yellow Warbler, Cassin’s Finch and Calliope Hummingbird. Among uncommon birds in the area are Wild Turkey, Northern Pygmy Owl, Long-eared Owl, Northern Goshawk and an occasional American Redstart. Rare birds found here have included Costa’s Hummingbird, Least Flycatcher, Eastern Phoebe, Plumbeous Vireo, Red-eyed Vireo, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, Veery, Gray Catbird, Northern Waterthrush, Blue-winged Warbler, Black-and-white Warbler, Magnolia Warbler, Chestnut-sided Warbler, Canada Warbler and Rose-breasted Grosbeak.

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