Pilot Rock

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Ashland Pond

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Mt Ashland

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Oredson Todd Reserve/Talent Irrigation Ditch

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Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument

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Howard Prairie

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North Mountain Park

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Emigrant Lake

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Grizzly Peak Trail

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Hyatt Lake (Reservoir)

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Hooper Springs

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Lithia Park

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2060 Road (Ashland/Lithia Park)

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Seasons

Winter
Spring
Summer
Fall

Location

South of Ashland, take the I-5 exit 6 (Mt. Ashland exit) and go south (straight) on Old Hwy 99. Go past the turnoff to Mt. Ashland and go under the freeway. Travel a short distance and find the BLM sign on the left for Pilot Rock. There are no further signs past this point but stay on the road with the most apparent use and keep going uphill until you reach the parking area below the rock (The BLM road is 40-2E-3). About .1 miles in, there is a junction. Stay left here and then keep to your right for the rest of the way and that should help. The Pacific Coast Trail crosses the road at the parking area. It’s about 2 miles from the freeway. Don’t be in too much of a hurry to get to the parking area. The birding on the way is terrific. Immediately after the turnoff area there is good oak habitat and later on, meadows (on private land) can be viewed from the road. Look for a dip in the road and an old quarry. This is a good place to park and explore.

Directions

Habitat and Birds

Coniferous forest and mountain meadows. Birds that can be expected here include Mountain Quail, Hairy Woodpecker, Western Wood-Pewee, Cassin’s Vireo, Steller’s Jay, Mt. Chickadee, Oak Titmouse, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Bewick’s Wren, Hermit Thrush, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Townsend’s Warbler, MacGillivray’s Warbler, Western Tanager, Chipping Sparrow, Dark-eyed Junco, Cassin’s Finch, and Pine Siskin. Examples of less common species would be Wild Turkey, Lewis’s Woodpecker, Red-naped Sapsucker, Hammond’s Flycatcher, Warbling Vireo, Gray Jay, Chestnut-backed Chickadee, Pygmy Nuthatch, Golden-crowned Kinglet, Townsend’s Solitaire, Hermit Warbler, California Towhee, Greentailed Towhee, Brewer’s Sparrow, Fox Sparrow, Lazuli Bunting, Bullock’s Oriole, and American Goldfinch. Source: OFO Publication No. 19, Guide to Birds of the Rogue Valley, Massey & Vroman.

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