Sauvie Island –Observation Platform

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Sauvie Island – Willow Bar

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Crown Zellerbach Trail – East End (OBT)

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Scappoose Waste Treatment Pond and Kessi Pond

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Scappoose Bottoms Honeyman Road

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Sauvie Island – Warrior Rock Trail

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Sauvie Island (General Info)

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Sauvie Island – Walton Beach

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Crown Zellerbach Trail – West End (OBT)

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Sauvie Island - The Wash

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Sauvie Island – Oak Island Nature Trail (OBT)

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Sauvie Island - Steelman Rd

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Santosh Quarry Lake

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Sauvie Island – Rentenaar Rd

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Sauvie Island – Collin’s Beach

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Sauvie Island – Racetrack Lake

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Sauvie Island – Gilbert Boat Ramp

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Sauvie Island – Rentenaar Point

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Bonnie Falls

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Seasons

Winter
Spring
Summer
Fall

Location

Open year round, Parking Permit required. The platform is well marked and just a little north of Willow Bar. It has a large parking area on the west side of Reeder Rd. It has a portable restroom facility here as well.

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Habitat and Birds

Wetland/seasonal overlook of Gay Lake. This spot is mainly good for Ducks, Geese, and raptors. Winter hunt days can drastically reduce the return in effort here. Up to 5000 Snow Geese can be seen at times. There is a decent chance for Rudy Ducks, Canvasbacks and more rarely, Redheads as well as the regular pantheon including Tundra, and the occasional Trumpeter Swan. Dusky Canada Geese favor this area as well. The occasional American Bittern can be seen moving through the marsh. Soras and Virginia Rails can be heard (rarely seen) as spring approaches. There are lots of raptors in the tree tops with an occasional Peregrine Falcon. Shorebirds can also be found on the lake edges in migration.

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