Scio

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Simpson Park and Bowman-Eads-Simpson Trail

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Tangent Sewer Ponds

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Albany Bryant and Montieth Parks

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Dever-Conner

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Albany Grand Prairie Park

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Albany Periwinkle School Pond

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Talking Water Gardens

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Albany Timber Linn Park

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Richardson Gap

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Albany Waverly Park

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Seasons

Winter
Spring
Summer
Fall

Location

Location: Scio is located east of I-5 between Stayton and Lebanon. From I5, take exit 238 and travel east on Hwy 99 (Jefferson Hwy) to Jefferson. Turn right on Main Street in Jefferson and take it out of town. The road will become Jefferson Scio Drive and will lead you to Scio about 8 miles away. The surrounding farmlands can produce good numbers of winter waterfowl and shorebirds.

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Habitat and Birds

Like many small towns in the Willamette Valley, Scio provides a diverse set of habitats and can be very birdy. Thomas Creek and Peters Ditch run through town and can attract nesters and migrants. Search the town for hummingbird and seed feeders. Species recorded here include Wood Duck, Ring-necked Pheasant, Mountain Quail, Accipiters, Band-tailed Pigeon, Northern Pygmy-owl, Vaux’s Swift, Red-breasted Sapsucker, Downy & Pileated Woodpeckers, Purple Martin, Chestnut-backed Chickadee, Blackthroated Gray Warbler, and Lesser Goldfinch. You can view the Scio Sewage Ponds from two locations. From the south end of Scio, turn off of Hwy 226 onto 6th Street. Go about 4 blocks and look to the south to view the northern-most pond. To see the southern pond, return to Hwy 226 and go south a short distance to Gilke Road. Take Gilke west until you see the ponds on your right. It is best to view both ponds from an elevated perch such as the bed of a pickup. During the week, it may be possible to gain access by asking at city hall, but this has not been ground tested. The gate off 6th is sometimes open, but birders should not go in without permission. There are records of all three species of phalarope from this location.

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