Carmen Lake

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Toolbox Meadows

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Illahee Flats

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Panther-Emile Loop

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Susan Creek Falls

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Lemolo Lake

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Panther-Emile Loop SIDE TRIP #3 MOOSE MEADOWS (local name, not on any map

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Panther-Emile Loop SIDE TRIP #4 GROTTO FALLS

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Stump Lake and Mowich Park (Driving Route)

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Tiller Ranger Station

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Lost Creek at Highway Falls

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Panther-Emile Loop SIDE TRIP #2 WILLOW FLATS SUMP

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Toketee Lake

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Panther-Emile Loop APPLE FIRE SIDE LOOP

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Thorn Prairie

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Rabbit Ears and Hershberger Mountain Access

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Diamond Lake and Sewage Ponds

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South Umpqua Falls

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Hemlock Lake

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Big Camas Loop

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Seasons

Winter
Spring
Summer
Fall

Location

Umpqua NF, Tiller RD.

From Tiller, take County Road 46 NE on the northside of the bridge by Tiller Ranger Station. Once you enter Forest Service land the road changes to FR 28. Continue 30.2 mi to lake near the junction of 28 and 2800380 which 1.4 above Camp Comfort

Directions

Habitat and Birds

This is a unique habitat for low elevation on the Umpqua National Forest.

Series of small ponds surrounded by mixed ponderosa and sugar pine with old-growth Douglas-fir; numerous dead trees and cattail marsh in ponds; rocky bluffs above; The combination of species is not usually found on this forest.

The surrounding roads will improve your list with the different habitats away from this small area of specialized habitat

nesting birds include Red-winged Blackbird, Peregrine Falcon, Vaux’s Swift, Wood Duck, Swainson’s Thrush, Pacific and House Wrens, Lincoln’s Sparrow, Wilson’s, Orange-crowned, and Nashville Warblers, Bushtit Yellow-breasted Chat, and at least five different flycatchers; Pileated Woodpecker, Red-breasted Sapsucker, Brown Creeper,

Warbling and Cassin’s Vireos, Rock and Canyon Wrens possible

Discussion