Diamond Lake and Sewage Ponds

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Seasons

Winter
Spring
Summer
Fall

Location

From I-5 exit 124 in Roseburg follow the signs for Hwy 138 east MP 78.8 to Diamond Lake. The lake (ice-covered December through mid-April) is circled by a paved road and a trail. The best birding areas are the campgrounds, boat launches, parking areas and the South Shore Picnic Area including the paved path from the parking lot south along the wet meadow to several small lakes; forest recreation pass is required. There is limited access to the Diamond Lake Sewer Ponds. From the lodge, make your way back out to NF 4795. Turn left (north) and travel 0.6 miles to Diamond Lake Loop. Turn left and go a short distance to a red cinder parking area. Park here and walk west along the road to the ponds. Walk along the outside of the fence to view all ponds. Permission and a key is needed to

enter. FR3703 which starts about 3 miles south of Hwy 138 and 230 junction leads

to higher elevations on the west side of Mt. Bailey.

Directions

Habitat and Birds

Habitat: open water, wet meadow and mixed conifer, sewage ponds.

Birds: grebes, mergansers, goldeneyes, gulls, Lesser Scaup, Osprey, Bald Eagle, Cinnamon Teal, Mountain Chickadee, Western Tanager, Golden-crowned Kinglet, Lewis’s Woodpecker, Townsend’s Solitaire, Western Wood-Pewee, Cassin’s Finch, warblers. Best birding: May-July, Sept-Oct.

Diamond Lake Sewage Ponds: Barrow’s Goldeneye, Northern Shoveler and numerous other waterfowl

Savannah Sparrows, American Pipits, and with them, Oregon’s 2nd and 5th Chestnut-collared Longspurs. Wilson’s Phalaropes other   migrant shorebirds in low numbers but interesting species including, Semipalmated Sandpiper, Willet, Red-necked Phalarope, and Long-billed Curlew. Snowy Egret, Loggerhead Shrike, Bank Swallow, and Lark, Vesper, Grasshopper, Chipping, and Brewer’s Sparrows have also been seen here (all D. Fix or D. Fix and D. Irons). A June 29th record of Solitary Sandpiper is the earliest report of an apparent fall migrant in the state, and the site also provided a late September Swamp Sparrow. Northern Goshawk is possible any time of year, and Black-backed Woodpeckers breed in the mixed conifer forest dominated by Shasta red fir beyond the fenced area.

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