Malheur Field Station

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Sodhouse Ranch

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Diamond Craters

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Malheur Center Patrol Road

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The Narrows

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Krumbo Reservoir

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Malheur National Wildlife Refuge Headquarters

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Benson Pond

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Page Springs Campground and nature trails

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Pete French Round Barn

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Frenchglen

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Buena Vista Ponds and Overlook

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Seasons

Winter
Spring
Summer
Fall

Location

Malheur Field Station (MFS) has a mission of promoting environmental education in the northern Great Basin. They provide lodging accommodations and seasonal food service.

MFS is located between the Narrows and Malheur NWR Headquarters 1.7 miles south of the Narrows-Princeton Road (Sodhouse Lane).

See the web site for detailed directions, information about programs, or reservations.

Directions

Habitat and Birds

The Field Station is a campus of buildings and mobile homes that house the staff and visiting birders. Small trees are found in this area and migrants will sometimes fall out here. The trees are small so a chance for a “birds-eye” view of Common Nighthawk or Chestnut-sided Warbler makes the quick detour to the Field Station worthwhile. Common Poorwill can be heard at night. Make sure you tour the entire facility. Common Nighthawks roost in the trees in summer and American Tree Sparrows sometimes winter near there. The Field Station Director lives here and keeps feeders stocked year round.  Be sure to drop into the bird blinds on the SW corner of the facility.  This is a new addition (as of 2022) to the complex.  In the spring of 2022 a Blue Grosbeak spent several days there.  Other rarities that have turned up at the field station include Lesser Nighthawk, Northern Mockingbird, Black-throated Sparrow, Orchard Oriole, Common and Great-tailed Grackles, Northern Waterthrush, and American Redstart.

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