Strawberry Mountain Wilderness

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Mt. Vernon Area

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John Day/Canyon City

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Moon Creek

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Clyde Holliday State Park

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Prairie City Area

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Seasons

Winter
Spring
Summer
Fall

Location

For current information on trail conditions, closures and fire information, go to the Malheur National Forest Strawberry Mnt Wilderness Website.

Strawberry Mountain rises over 9000’ in this wilderness, and the main east/west ridge averages about 8000’ in elevation. The 1640 road off of the 16 road (that terminates in Seneca) takes you to two trailheads: Road’s End and High Lake. Look for Mountain Bluebirds, Rock Wren, Clark’s Nutcracker, Mountain Chickadees, Pine Siskin, Red-tailed Hawk, Dark-eyed Juncos, Red Crossbills; and at Indian Springs Camp, look for Pileated Woodpecker and Hermit Thrushes. There are several trails that are reached from Canyon Creek Road and a few more along the eastern and southeastern edge. There is no access from Dog Creek, but there is access to Canyon Mt from Canyon City. Canyon Mt trailhead, Pine Creek and Road’s End take you to the highest elevations. Indian Creek trail starts in the woods, but a majority of it is in a burn that happened maybe 20 years ago. Look for grouse and other high altitude species. Osprey and some waterfowl can be found on lakes that are reached by good trails. Rocky Mountain Goats can be found on the slopes, especially above Slide Lake and black bears can often be seen foraging in the fall.

NF 1640 – 44.173797, -118.679918 Indian Springs CG off NF 1640 – 44.257946, -118.696970 Road’s End Trailhead – 44.276923, -118.699202 (11 mi. north of NF 16) Canyon Mountain Trailhead – 44.364308, -118.925876 Pine Creek Trailhead – 44.2903, -118.718

The SummitPost Strawberry Mnts Website is a climbing site that has good information on how to access this site.

Directions

Habitat and Birds

Strawberry Mountain rises over 9000’ in this wilderness, and the main east/west ridge averages about 8000’ in elevation. The 1640 road off of the 16 road (that terminates in Seneca) takes you to two trailheads: Road’s End and High Lake. Look for Mountain Bluebirds, Rock Wren, Clark’s Nutcracker, Mountain Chickadees, Pine Siskin, Red-tailed Hawk, Dark-eyed Juncos, Red Crossbills; and at Indian Springs Camp, look for Pileated Woodpecker and Hermit Thrushes. There are several trails that are reached from Canyon Creek Road and a few more along the eastern and southeastern edge. There is no access from Dog Creek, but there is access to Canyon Mt from Canyon City. Canyon Mt trailhead, Pine Creek and Road’s End take you to the highest elevations. Indian Creek trail starts in the woods, but a majority of it is in a burn that happened maybe 20 years ago. Look for grouse and other high altitude species. Osprey and some waterfowl can be found on lakes that are reached by good trails. Rocky Mountain Goats can be found on the slopes, especially above Slide Lake and black bears can often be seen foraging in the fall.

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